Mobile Technology: Good, Bad, or Just a Tool?

Much is made of the power of mobile phones.  Indeed, much is made of them right here on this blog.  But, as with all seemingly magical tools of development/healthcare/education/whatever, there is a tendency to get swept up in the zeitgeist and to think of the mobile phone as a silver bullet. And as with all things, it’s not. In fact, we can’t think of the phone, or the internet, or any other technology as inherently good or bad. They’re simply tools. New, powerful, disruptive tools– but just tools.

Bear with me while I illustrate my point by weaving a thread through two articles published recently in faraway parts of the world:

  • Yesterday, a Sri Lankan newspaper covered a recent leak that the government intelligence services had been tapping the phones of an influential former general and his associates. The tapping was motivated not by any security concern, but by political concerns– the general represented a powerful opposition group.
  • An opinion piece in the African Business Daily last week looked at the “pros and cons of increased access to mobile phones” in Uganda. The “pros” were the usual litany of access to information and services– but it was just that: access. (The “cons” had mostly to do with Uganda’s highly regressive taxation scheme, but that’s a conversation for another day.)

Just a toolThe point here is twofold.  First, mobile technology, like any other technology, is subject to misuse and abuse by those in power. Part of NDN’s big argument about new technology (and the reason that we got involved in this space in the first place) is that new technolgoies are changing society in a similar way to how radio changed the world in the 1920s and 30s. But just as FDR used the radio to speak directly to the American people, Hitler used radio to speak to Germans.

As we see in Sri Lanka, and as we saw in Iran, mobile technology can be used equally by those on either side of any struggle. This is by no means an argument against the technology itself– as I said, it’s neither inherently good nor inherently bad– but simply a reminder that we must be watchful for the same evils as ever.

Second, in Uganda as everywhere, access to a phone and a network is never the end in itself. The power of the technology lies in the information you can access and the services you can take advantage of. That’s why we see our mission at Global Mobile as greater than simply expanding access to mobile technology– even moreso, we’re thinking about how we can leverage this technology to improve lives and socities around the world. Technology and services– one is useless without the other.

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